Value and Color

A single design can change considerably, depending on the use of color and value.

  • URL: Saving Illustrator Swatches as Adobe Swatch Exchange format
  • Zip: Value and Color
  • 1st Artboard
    1. Make a checkerboard by filling in the squares with black.
    2. Use only shade of 50% gray to fill the circles.
  • 2nd Artboard
    1. Make squares black, white, and one shade of 50% gray.
    2. Use that one shade of 50% gray, white and fill circles.
    3. Have one circle filled with yellow.
  • 3rd Artboard
    1. Make squares black, and one shade of 50% gray.
    2. Use that any shade of gray and black, to fill circles.
    3. Have one circle filled with yellow in the same location as the 2nd Artboard.
  • 4th Artboard
    1. Make squares, yellow, orange, magenta, green and blue.
    2. Make circles with orange, red, yellow, green and blue.
    3. Divide the design by placing warm colors with warm and cool color with cool.
  • 5th Artboard
    1. Make squares, yellow, orange, magenta, green and blue.
    2. Make circles with orange, red, yellow, green and blue.
    3. Place warm colored circles over cool color squares.
    4. Place cool colored circles over warm color squares.

Value: Design Principle

  • Definition: The lightness or darkness of an object or portion of a design, regardless of color, is its value. Sometimes grouped with color, value is a color-related element of design.
  • Value is inherent in a design as soon as any image is placed in the format
  • Animals and insects utilize value as a defense. mechanism by assuming shades of the environment to protect themselves from predators.
  • The greater the difference in value between the object and its background, the greater the contrast.
  • You can acheive contrast without value (example: using shapes and textures)
  • Zip: Value